Managed isolation and quarantine COVID-19 facilities will now effectively have dedicated nursing staff.  Where there are exceptions, the nurse will be required to stand down and have a negative PCR COVID-19 before returning to another clinical area.   This was announced by the Minister of Health Chris Hipkins.

The Nurses Society of New Zealand had raised concerns over the fact that many nurses working at these facilities, as well as in border-screening roles, also work concurrently in other services.   

From August, DHBs will take over the contract from an agency for the health services in the managed isolation and quarantine facilities.    

The Society has received multiple approaches from members working in the facilities wanting advice on whether it was consistent with best practice to be working one day in an isolation or quarantine facility and the next day in another health setting.

Nurses Society Director David Wills says, “Obviously, as health professionals, nurses are well versed in infection-control protocols and PPE use, but being hypercautious where possible makes sense.”  

"Hence, a dedicated workforce for managed isolation and quarantine facilities is the best approach.”

The Government and the Ministry of Health have generally done an outstanding job in response to COVID-19, in terms of both policies and execution, to the point that there has been no community transmission for nearly 90 days – an outstanding achievement that needs to be protected at all costs.   


Here is an interview with David Wills recently discussing the issue:

https://www.rnz.co.nz/national/programmes/ninetonoon/audio/2018756389/union-worried-over-nurses-in-both-hospitals-quarantine-hotels

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12350426&ref=recommendedv1

Managed isolation and quarantine COVID-19 facilities will now effectively have dedicated nursing staff.  Where there are exceptions, the nurse will be required to stand down and have a negative PCR COVID-19 before returning to another clinical area.   This was announced by the Minister of Health Chris Hipkins.

The Nurses Society of New Zealand had raised concerns over the fact that many nurses working at these facilities, as well as in border-screening roles, also work concurrently in other services.   

From August, DHBs will take over the contract from an agency for the health services in the managed isolation and quarantine facilities.    

The Society has received multiple approaches from members working in the facilities wanting advice on whether it was consistent with best practice to be working one day in an isolation or quarantine facility and the next day in another health setting.

Nurses Society Director David Wills says, “Obviously, as health professionals, nurses are well versed in infection-control protocols and PPE use, but being hypercautious where possible makes sense.”  

"Hence, a dedicated workforce for managed isolation and quarantine facilities is the best approach.”

The Government and the Ministry of Health have generally done an outstanding job in response to COVID-19, in terms of both policies and execution, to the point that there has been no community transmission for nearly 90 days – an outstanding achievement that needs to be protected at all costs.   


Here is an interview with David Wills recently discussing the issue:

https://www.rnz.co.nz/national/programmes/ninetonoon/audio/2018756389/union-worried-over-nurses-in-both-hospitals-quarantine-hotels

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12350426&ref=recommendedv1